Kathy Reichs

Kathy Reichs

New York Times bestselling author Kathy Reichs is a forensic anthropologist on whose life and work the popular television show, "Bones," is based. She currently is with the Laboratoire des Sciences Judiciaires et de Médecine Légale in the province of Quebec. She is one of the few forensic anthropologists certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology. She is past Vice President of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and serves on the National Police Services Advisory Board in Canada. A professor of anthropology at The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Dr. Reichs is a native of Chicago, where she received her Ph.D. at Northwestern.

Her work as a forensic anthropologist is internationally recognized.  She has traveled to Rwanda to testify at the UN Tribunal on Genocide; helped identify individuals from mass graves in Guatemala; and done forensic work at Ground Zero in New York. She has identified war dead from World War II and from all of Southeast Asia, and has even examined remains from the tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

Experiences she has had while working in forensic anthropology spawned her best selling novels.  Each new story plays on an aspect of forensic anthropology and matter classification that Dr. Reichs has personally used in her work, which makes the work of her main character, Temperance Brennan, authentic.

Kathy's first Temperance Brennan novel, Déjà Dead, catapulted her to fame when it became a New York Times bestseller and won the 1997 Ellis Award for Best First Novel.

Flash and Bones
(Pocket Books, 2012)

Just as 200,000 fans are pouring into town for Race Week, a body is found in a barrel of asphalt next to the Charlotte Motor Speedway. The next day, a NASCAR crew member comes to Temperance Brennan's office at the Mecklenburg County Medical Examiner to share a devastating story. Twelve years earlier, Wayne Gamble's sister, Cindi, then a high school senior and aspiring racer, disappeared along with her boyfriend, Cale Lovette. Lovette kept company with a group of right-wing extremists known as the Patriot Posse. Could the body be Cindi's? Or Cale's?

At the time of their disappearance, the FBI joined the investigation, only to terminate it weeks later. Was there a cover-up? As Tempe juggles multiple theories, the discovery of a strange, deadly substance in the barrel alongside the body throws everything into question. Then an employee of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention goes missing during Race Week. Tempe can't overlook the coincidence. Was this man using his lab chemicals for murder? Or is the explanation even more sinister? What other secrets lurk behind the festive veneer of Race Week?

A turbocharged story of secrets and murder unfolds in this, the fourteenth thrilling novel in Reichs's "cleverly plotted and expertly maintained series" (The New York Times Book Review). With the smash hit Bones about to enter its seventh season and in full syndication—and her most recent novel, Spider Bones, an instant New York Times bestseller—Kathy Reichs is at the top of her game.


Spider Bones
(Scribner, 2010)

John Lowery was declared dead in 1968—the victim of a Huey crash in Vietnam, his body buried long ago in North Carolina. Four decades later, Temperance Brennan is called to the scene of a drowning in Hemmingford, Quebec. The victim appears to have died while in the midst of a bizarre sexual practice. The corpse is later identified as John Lowery. But how could Lowery have died twice, and how did an American soldier end up in Canada?

Tempe sets off for the answer, exhuming Lowery's grave in North Carolina and taking the remains to Hawaii for reanalysis—to the headquarters of JPAC, the U.S. military's Joint POW/ MIA Accounting Command, which strives to recover Americans who have died in past conflicts. In Hawaii, Tempe is joined by her colleague and ex-lover Detective Andrew Ryan (how "ex" is he?) and by her daughter, who is recovering from her own tragic loss. Soon another set of remains is located, with Lowery's dog tags tangled among them. Three bodies—all identified as Lowery.

And then Tempe is contacted by Hadley Perry, Honolulu's flamboyant medical examiner, who needs help identifying the remains of an adolescent boy found offshore. Was he the victim of a shark attack? Or something much more sinister?

A complex and riveting tale of deceit and murder unfolds in this, the thirteenth thrilling novel in Reichs's "cleverly plotted and expertly maintained series" (The New York Times Book Review). With the smash hit Bones now in its fifth season and in full syndication—and her most recent novel, 206 Bones, an instant New York Times bestseller—Kathy Reichs is at the top of her game.


206 Bones
(Pocket Star, 2010)

The #1 New York Times bestselling author and producer of the Fox television hit, Bones, returns with a spectacular new Temperance Brennan novel.

There are 206 bones in the human body. Forensic anthropologists know them intimately, can read in them stories of brief or long lives and use them to reconstruct every kind of violent end. 206 Bones opens with Tempe regaining consciousness and discovering that she is in some kind of very small, very dark, very cold enclosed space. She is bound, hands to feet. Who wants Tempe dead, or at least out of the way, and why? Tempe begins slowly to reconstruct...

Tempe and Lieutenant Ryan had accompanied the recently discovered remains of a missing heiress from Montreal to the Chicago morgue. Suddenly, Tempe was accused of mishandling the autopsy -- and the case. Someone made an incriminating phone call. Within hours, the one man with information about the call was dead. Back in Montreal, the corpse of a second elderly woman was found in the woods, and then a third.

Seamlessly weaving between Tempe's present-tense terror as she's held captive and her memory of the cases of these murdered women, Reichs conveys the incredible devastation that would occur if a forensic colleague sabotaged work in the lab. The chemistry between Tempe and Ryan intensifies as this complex, riveting tale unfolds. Reichs is writing at the top of her game.


New York Times Best Seller
Devil Bones
(Pocket Star, June 2009)

In a house under renovation in Charlotte, North Carolina, a plumber discovers a forgotten cellar, and some rather grisly remains—the severed head of a teenage girl, several decapitated chickens, and a couple of cauldrons containing beads, feathers, bones, and other relics of religious ceremonies. In a river not far away, an adolescent boy's torso carved with a pentagram, is found. Are these crimes the work of Satanists and devil worshippers?

Nothing is clear, neither when the deaths occurred, nor where. Was the skull brought to the cellar or was the girl murdered there? As Temperance Brennan is called in to investigate, citizen vigilantes intent on a witch hunt are led by a preacher turned politician, looking for revenge.


Bones to Ashes
(Pocket Star, 2008)

Temperance Brennan, like her creator Kathy Reichs, is a brilliant, sexy forensic anthropologist called on to solve the toughest cases. But for Tempe, the discovery of a young girl's skeleton in Acadia, Canada, is more than just another assignment. Évangéline, Tempe's childhood best friend, was also from Acadia. Named for the character in the Longfellow poem, Évangéline was the most exotic person in Tempe's eight-year-old world. When Évangéline disappeared, Tempe was warned not to search for her, that the girl was "dangerous."

Thirty years later, flooded with memories, Tempe cannot help wondering if this skeleton could be the friend she lost so many years ago. And what is the meaning of the strange skeletal lesions found on the bones of the young girl?

Meanwhile, Tempe's beau, Ryan, investigates a series of cold cases. Three girls dead. Four missing. Could the New Brunswick skeleton be part of the pattern? As Tempe draws on the latest advances in forensic anthropology to penetrate the past, Ryan hunts down a serial predator.


Break No Bones
(Pocket Books, 2007)

To some, the dead are a commodity. For Tempe Brennan, they hold the key to cracking a horrific crime ring.

Among the ancient remains in a Native American burial ground, Tempe discovers a fresh skeleton -- and what began as an ordinary teaching stint at an archeology field school in Charleston, South Carolina, fast becomes a heated investigation into an alarming pattern of homicides. The clues hidden in the bones lead to a street clinic where a monstrous discovery awaits, and Tempe -- whose personal life is in upheaval, with two men competing for her -- can't afford any distractions as she pieces together a shattering and terrifying puzzle.


Cross Bones
A Temperance Brennan Novel
(Pocket Star, 2006)

The key to a modern murder lies in the sands of history.

Examining a badly decomposed corpse is de rigueur for forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan. But puzzling damage on the body of a shooting victim, an Orthodox Jewish man, suggests this is no ordinary Montreal murder. When a stranger slips Tempe a photograph of a skeleton unearthed at an archaeological site, Tempe uncovers chilling ties between the dead man and secrets long buried in the dust of Israel. Traveling there with Detective Andrew Ryan, Tempe plunges into an international mystery as old as Jesus, and centered on the controversial discovery of Christ's tomb. Has a mastermind lured her into an elaborate hoax? If not, Tempe may be on the brink of rewriting two thousand years of history -- if she can survive the foes dead set on burying her.


Monday Mourning
(Pocket Star, 2005)

Temperance Brennan, forensic anthropologist for both North Carolina and Quebec, has come to Montreal during the bleak days of December to testify as an expert witness at a murder trial.

She should be going over her notes, but instead she's digging in the basement of a pizza parlor, investigating the skeletonized remains of three young women. How did they get there? When did they die?

Homicide detective Luc Claudel believes the bones are historic. Not his case, not his concern. The pizza parlor owner found nineteenth-century buttons near the skeletons. Claudel takes them as an indicator of the bones' antiquity.

But something doesn't make sense. Tempe examines the bones in her lab and establishes approximate age with Carbon 14. Study of tooth enamel tells her where the women were born. If she's right, Claudel has three recent murders on his hands. Definitely his case.

Detective Andrew Ryan, meanwhile, is acting mysteriously. What are those private phone calls he takes, and why does he suddenly disappear just when Tempe is beginning to hope he might be a permanent part of her life?

As Tempe searches for answers, she finds herself drawn deep into a web of evil into which women have disappeared, never to return....Tempe may be next.


Bare Bones
(Pocket Star, 2004)

It's a summer of sizzling heat in Charlotte where Dr. Temperance Brennan, forensic anthropologist for the North Carolina medical examiner, looks forward to her first vacation in years. A romantic vacation. She's almost out the door when the bones start appearing.

A newborn's charred remains turn up in a woodstove. The mother, Tamela Banks, hardly more than a child herself, has disappeared. Did she kill her infant, or is an innocent teenager also about to become a victim?

A small plane crashes in a North Carolina cornfield on a sunny afternoon. Both pilot and passenger are burned beyond recognition. Was it pilot error? Something more sinister? And what is the mysterious black substance covering the bodies?

Most puzzling of all are the bones discovered at a remote farm outside Charlotte. What has Tempe's dog, Boyd, unearthed? The remains seem to be of animal origin, but Tempe is shocked when she gets them to her lab.

With help from a special detective friend, Tempe must investigate a poignant and terrifying case that comes at the worst possible moment. Daughter Katy has a new boyfriend who Tempe fears may have something to hide. And important personal decisions face Tempe. Is it time for emotional commitment? Will she have the chance to find out?

Everything must wait on the bones. What story do they tell? Why are the X rays and DNA so perplexing? Who is trying to keep Tempe from the answers? Someone is following her. Someone is following Katy. That someone must be stopped before it's too late.

With the riveting authenticity that only world-class forensic anthropologist Kathy Reichs can bring to her fiction, Bare Bones asks important questions and thrills us to its pulsating end. Fresh from the success of Grave Secrets, Reichs proves once again that she is the consummate crime-writing star.


Grave Secrets
(Pocket Star, 2003)

On a summer morning in 1982, soldiers enter a Guatemalan village and massacre its women and children. Terrified of meeting a similar fate, returning relatives quickly bury their dead in makeshift graves.

Today these families refer to their lost members as "the disappeared, " and human rights teams are trying to find them. Dr. Temperance Brennan, international forensic anthropologist, has been asked to investigate one of the most heartbreaking cases of her career. As she digs in the cold, damp soil, clues emerge: a hair clip, a tiny sneaker, the hip bone of a child less than two years old.

Something savage happened in the highlands two decades ago, and something savage is happening today. Four girls are missing from Guatemala City, and the victims may be linked. An American human rights investigator is murdered as Tempe listens to her screams on the phone. Will Tempe be the next victim in a web of intrigue that spans decades?

As she did in her earlier bestsellers, Reichs has woven cutting-edge science throughout the novel -- from analysis of fetal bone structure to septic tank chemistry.

Grave Secrets is gripping, chillingly realistic, and showcases a queen of the genre at the top of her game.


Fatal Voyage
(Pocket Star, 2002)

Temperance Brennan hears the news on her car radio. An Air TransSouth flight has gone down in the mountains of western North Carolina, taking with it eighty-eight passengers and crew. As a forensic anthropologist and a member of the regional DMORT team, Tempe rushes to the scene to assist in body recovery and identification.

Tempe has seen death many times, working with the medical examiners in North Carolina and Montreal, but never has tragedy struck with such devastation. She finds a field of carnage: torsos in trees, limbs strewn among bursting suitcases and smoldering debris. Many of the dead are members of a university soccer team. Is Tempe's daughter, Katy, among them?

Frantic with worry, Tempe joins colleagues from the FBI, the NTSB, and other agencies to search for explanations. Was the plane brought down by a bomb, an insurance plot, a political assassination, or simple mechanical failure? And what about the prisoner on the plane who was being extradited to Canada? Did someone want him silenced forever?

Even more puzzling for Tempe is a disembodied foot found near the debris field. Tempe's microscopic analysis suggests it could not have belonged to any passenger. Whose foot is it, and where is the rest of the body? And what about the disturbing evidence Tempe discovers in the soil outside a remote mountain enclave? What secrets lie hidden there, and why are certain people eager to stop Tempe's investigation? Is she learning too much? Coming too close?

With help from Montreal detective Andrew Ryan, who has his own sad reason for being at the crash, and from a very special dog named Boyd, Tempe calls upon deep reserves of courage and upon her forensic skill to uncover a shocking, multilayered tale of deceit and depravity.

Written with the riveting authenticity that only world-class forensic anthropologist Kathy Reichs can provide,Fatal Voyage pairs witty, elegant prose with pulse-pounding storytelling in a tour de force worthy of crime writing's new superstar.


Deadly Decisions
(Pocket Star, 2001)

Nobody tells a chilling story like international best-selling author Kathy Reichs, whose "most valuable tool is her expertise...she's the real thing" (New York Newsday).Drawing on her years as a top forensic anthropologist, Reichs brings her cutting-edge scientific know-how to this poignant, terrifying new tour de force.

Nine-year-old Emily Anne Toussaint is shot dead on a Montreal street. A North Carolina teenager disappears from her home and parts of what may be her skeleton are found hundreds of miles away. For Dr. Temperance Brennan, a forensic anthropologist in both Montreal and North Carolina, the deaths kindle deep emotions that propel her on a harrowing journey into the world of outlaw motorcycle gangs.

As a scientist, Tempe should remain dispassionate. As a caring individual, she yearns to take the killers off the streets. Emily Anne was cut down in a biker crossfire. The North Carolina victim, Savannah Osprey, was last seen hitching a ride with a transient biker. Tempe's nephew, Kit, is intrigued by motorcycles. Does he understand the difference between legitimate riders and gangs, or is he too mesmerized to comprehend that outlaw bikers are big trouble?

With her boss Pierre LaManche in the hospital, and her friend Andrew Ryan disturbingly unavailable, Tempe begins a perilous investigation into a culture where evil often wears a mask. From blood-splatter patterns and ground-penetrating radar to bone-sample analysis,Deadly Décisions triumphantly combines the authenticity of a world-class forensic professional with the narrative power of a brilliant new crime-writing star. This richly nuanced thriller is sure to catapult a uniquely gifted author to even greater heights.


Death du Jour
(Pocket Star, 2000)

Rarely has a first-time novelist made such a spectacular international publishing debut as Kathy Reichs did with her acclaimed forensic thriller Déjà Dead. A New York Times bestseller, a number one bestseller in both Canada and Britain, and winner of the prestigious Ellis Award for Best First Novel of 1997, it was also a Main Selection of the Book-of-the-Month Club, with foreign rights sold to nineteen countries.

Now, in Death du Jour, the author who lives the life she writes about extends her reach while still building on the rich ensemble cast, page-turning suspense, and cutting-edge forensic detail that made Déjà Dead an international sensation.

Assaulted by the bitter cold of a Montreal winter, the American-born Dr. Temperance Brennan, Forensic Anthropologist for the Province of Quebec, digs for a corpse where Sister Élisabeth Nicolet, dead for over a century and now a candidate for sainthood, should be lying in her grave. A strange, small coffin, buried in the recesses of a decaying church, holds the first clue to the cloistered nun's fate.

The puzzle surrounding Sister Élisabeth Nicolet's life and death provides a welcome contrast to discoveries at a burning chalet, where scorched and twisted bodies await Tempe's professional expertise. Who were these people? What brought them to this gruesome fate? And where are the children?

Homicide Detective Andrew Ryan, with whom Tempe has a combustive history, joins her in the arson investigation. From the fire scene they are drawn into the worlds of an enigmatic and controversial sociologist, a mysterious commune, and a primate colony on a Carolina island. Tempe is overwhelmed by the case, confused by her mounting attraction to Ryan, and plagued by worries about her sister Harry's search for spiritual awakening.

Featuring the kind of forensic detail that only Kathy Reichs can provide -- from skeletal reconstruction to insect analysis -- Death du Jour takes the reader on a riveting journey from the morgue to the lab to the crime scene, from the warmth of a barrier island to the frigid cold of a deadly ice storm. With this poignant and powerful work, Kathy Reichs confirms her status as a brilliant new crime-writing star.


Deja Dead
(Pocket Books 10th anniv. ed., 2007)

A born storyteller, Dr. Kathy Reichs walks in the steps of her heroine, Dr. Temperance Brennan. She spends her days in the autopsy suite, the courtroom, the crime lab, with cops, and at exhumation sites. Often her long days turn into harrowing nights.

It's June in Montreal, and Tempe, who has left a shaky marriage back home in North Carolina to take on the challenging assignment of director of forensic anthropology for the province of Quebec, looks forward to a relaxing weekend.

First, though, she must stop at a newly uncovered burial site in the heart of the city. One look at the decomposed and decapitated corpse, stored neatly in plastic bags, tells her she'll spend the weekend in the crime lab. This is homicide of the worst kind. To begin to find some answers, Tempe must first identify the victim. Who is this person with the reddish hair and a small bone structure?

First, though, she must stop at a newly uncovered burial site in the heart of the city. One look at the decomposed and decapitated corpse, stored neatly in plastic bags, tells her she'll spend the weekend in the crime lab. This is homicide of the worst kind. To begin to find some answers, Tempe must first identify the victim. Who is this person with reddish hair and a small bone structure? Something about the crime scene is familiar to Tempe: the stashing of the body parts, the meticulous dismemberment. One case in particular comes to mind: the murder of sixteen-year-old Chantale Trottier, who'd arrived in the morgue naked, less than a year before, and packaged in plastic garbage bags. Tempe's convinced there are parallels between the two cases, but it will take more victims to persuade her police colleagues. Knowing there is a killer on the streets who may soon find a new victim, Tempe calls upon all her forensic skills, including bone, tooth, and bite mark analysis and X-ray microflourescence to try to prove that the cases are related and to stop the killer before he strikes again. The next victim may be closer to home--Tempe's longtime friend Gabby, her college-age daughter Katy, or Tempe herself.

Told with lacerating authenticity and passion, Deja Deadis both poignant and terrifying as it hurtles toward its page-turning conclusion and instantly catapults its author into the top ranks of crime authors.

SELECTED REVIEWS FOR
206 Bones

Publishers Weekly Starred Review
At the start of bestseller Reichs's outstanding 12th thriller to feature Dr. Temperance Brennan (after Devil Bones), Brennan finds herself bound and injured in an underground tomb. In flashbacks, Reichs fills in the how and why of the forensic anthropologist's deadly predicament. When Brennan and Andrew Ryan of the Sûreté du Québec arrive in Chicago on business, she's accused of botching the autopsy of Rose Jurmain, a Canadian heiress. Knowing only that an anonymous caller instigated the investigation, Brennan is determined to uncover who's out to sabotage her. Back in her Montreal lab, Brennan soon realizes that not only is Jurmain's death possibly linked to the brutal murders of other elderly women but that whoever is out to tarnish her reputation refuses to back off. With her usual blend of cutting-edge forensic science and a stubborn, compelling heroine, Reichs manages to juggle several story lines without losing an ounce of momentum.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

 

SELECTED REVIEWS FOR
Devil Bones

Publishers Weekly
Dr. Temperance Brennan's quest to identify two corpses pits her against citizen vigilantes intent on a witch-hunt in bestseller Reichs's exciting 11th thriller to feature the forensic anthropologist (after 2007's Bones to Ashes). While working in Charlotte, N.C., Brennan investigates remains unearthed during a housing renovation and discovers disturbing clues possibly pointing to voodoo or Santeria. She must determine if the bones, including the skull of a teenage girl, are linked to an unidentified headless torso found in a nearby lake. Intent on using the deaths as the cornerstone of his crusade against immorality, fundamentalist preacher turned politician Boyce Lingo claims that the bodies bear the mark of devil worshippers. With the help of Det. Erskine Skinny Slidell, Brennan unearths a tangled web of dirty politics, religious persecution and male prostitution. Reichs, whose work inspired the hit TV series Bones, once again expertly blends science and complex character development.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved."

Booklist
In an era when many mystery writers feel compelled to add forensics to their investigations but do so in a tentative, superficial manner, or when forensic scientists who move into fiction sometimes forge monstrous mixes of good science and bad fiction writing, Reichs is a standout on both counts. She's a double hitter, who has both a deep knowledge of forensic science (Reichs is a forensic anthropologist and producer of the Fox TV hit Bones) and a formidable way of incorporating science with character and plot in her Temperance Brennan series. This time out, Brennan, an academic anthropologist with ties to the University of North Carolina, the N.C. Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, and a forensic lab in Montreal, concentrates on two grisly local discoveries. One is the torso of a teen boy in a river. The other is a basement in Charlotte, where a plumber finds the skull of a teenage girl and enough feathers, beads, and cauldrons to suggest some weird goings-on. Brennan's brisk first-person narrative is often wryly funny, especially when she lambastes other academics and various forensic bureaucrats. Her expertise is snappily and entertainingly delivered. This series can be entered into and enjoyed at any point.
-- Connie Fletcher

Reichs is a standout...[with] a formidable way of incorporating science with character and plot.... Her expertise is snappily and entertainingly delivered.
-- Booklist

Loved it! I'm amazed by how seamlessly Reichs makes the transition from forensic jargon to snappy, funny dialogue -- scientist to great storyteller. What's not to admire and envy?
-- Sandra Brown, author of Play Dirty

Reichs is a standout...[with] a formidable way of incorporating science with character and plot.... Her expertise is snappily and entertainingly delivered.
-- Booklist

 

SELECTED REVIEWS FOR
Cross Bones

Publishers Weekly
Forensic anthropologist Dr. Temperance "Tempe" Brennan gets caught in mysteries past and present when she's called in to determine if illegal antiquities dealer Avram Ferris's gunshot death is murder or suicide. An acquaintance of Avram suggests the former: he hands Tempe a photograph of a skeleton, taken in Israel in 1963, and insists it's the reason Avram is dead. Tempe's longtime boyfriend, Quebecois detective Andrew Ryan, is also involved with the case, so the duo head to Israel where they attempt to solve the murder and a mystery revolving around a first-century tomb that may contain the remains of the family of Jesus Christ. This find threatens the worldwide Christian community, the Israeli and Jewish hierarchy and numerous illegal antiquity dealers, any of whom might be out to kill Tempe and Ryan. Not that Tempe notices. She has the habit of being oblivious to danger, which quickly becomes annoying, as does Reichs's tendency to end chapters with a heavy-handed cliffhanger ("His next words sent ice up my spine"). The plot is based on a number of real-life anthropological mysteries, and fans of such will have a good time, though thriller readers looking for chills and kills may not find the novel quite as satisfying.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.Booklist
In the eighth entry in Reichs' popular mystery series, forensic anthropologist Tempe Brennan spends more time contemplating biblical history than modern-day murder. A preface sets the stage, providing a bit of factual context for the puzzle that emerges when Tempe is given a photo of an articulated skeleton, which she is told is the key to the suspicious death of a slightly shady Orthodox Jewish merchant. The legend on the back of a photo leads to the bones themselves, 2,000-year-old remains that excite not only Tempe but also her friend Jake Drum, a biblical archaeologist, who suggests that the bones might even belong to Jesus himself! Unlike Tempe's previous forays into the world of crime, this episode isn't long on thrills. Instead, we get a fairly complicated lesson in biblical history, some radical theory to ponder, and the itch to read real-life religion professor James Tabor's upcoming book about Masada and ancient bones, The Jesus Dynasty, to which Reichs refers in an afterword. Yet another read-alike for Da Vinci Code fans.
-- Stephanie Zvirin
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

"A riveting thriller."
-- Charlotte Observer (NC)

"A spirited rival to The Da Vinci Code...Reichs is in top form."
-- Sunday Times (London)

"Fans of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation should be in heaven."
-- People

"Such bloody good beach reading."
-- USA Today

"There's nothing like a morgue mystery to brighten up a summer day."
-- Entertainment Weekly

"Likely to leave you with the shivers of an ice storm."
-- People

"As good as Cornwell at her best."
-- Detroit Free Press

"The science is fascinating, and every minute in the morgue with Tempe is golden."
-- Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times Book Review

 

SELECTED REVIEWS FOR
Monday Mourning

From Publishers Weekly
Forensic scientist Tempe Brennan isn't happy: it's freezing in Montreal, her detective boyfriend is giving her the cold shoulder and her macho colleagues won't take her seriously. When Reichs's heroine is called in to examine three skeletons discovered in the basement of a pizza parlor at the start of the seventh installment in this popular series, her instincts tell her a crime was recently committed. Chauvinistic homicide detective Luc Claudel doesn't agree, but Tempe forges ahead and soon discovers that the victims are young women, probably teenagers killed sometime in the 1980s. Already feeling vulnerable because she's left her beloved daughter, Katy, back home in North Carolina, Tempe is further troubled by the indifference of formerly avid lover Andrew Ryan (another Montreal detective). Meanwhile, new developments lead Tempe and her reluctant colleagues to suspect a creepy former pawn store owner of serial kidnappings, torture and grisly murder. What's best about Reichs, and often unappreciated in reviews, is not the informative detail that she brings to Tempe's forensic sleuthing, though that's certainly engrossing. It's the same well-observed detail and incisive analysis applied to other aspects of the story. Tempe deconstructs Ryan's every evasive gesture and casual comment and describes an ominously darkened room, the glow from a UV light and an armada of snow plows with vivid precision. Here, as previously, readers will be as invested in Tempe's life as in her case. Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

 

SELECTED REVIEWS FOR
Bare Bones

From Publishers Weekly
Feisty forensic anthropologist Temperance (Tempe) Brennan is supposed to be on vacation, but body parts keep turning up. At the start of her sixth adventure, she's awaiting the arrival of her current flame, Quebecois sleuth Andrew Ryan, so she can head for the beach near her hometown of Charlotte, N.C. Before he shows up, she's called in to use her world-class forensics skills when a local janitor's infant granddaughter is found dead and charred in an oven. Then some strange, decomposing remains (" 'Human?' 'I'm not sure' ") are discovered by Brennan's dog during a barbecue at a local lakeside resort. Ryan finally arrives, but Brennan's vacation is indefinitely put on hold when a small plane crashes nearby. Two people are dead, and her expertise is required yet again ("The skull had suffered massive communitive fracturing on impact. The fire had done the rest"). Brennan eventually realizes that all three cases are linked to a drug-smuggling ring that also dabbles in poaching exotic animals. As she pursues her investigations, she is forced to work with "Skinny" Slidell, a redneck cop who rubs her the wrong way, but tension is defused by the presence of Ryan, who gamely gives up his vacation to pitch in. He matches Brennan quip for quip, and Tempe's dog, Boyd, provides extra comic relief. Reichs has built a reputation on cut-to-the-chase writing and swift plotting, and this latest effort delivers everything her fans have come to expect. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

 

SELECTED REVIEWS FOR
Fatal Voyage

From Publishers Weekly
With four crime thrillers to her name, Reichs (Deadly Decisions) seems to have settled into a comfortable routine with forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan, whose adventures grow more engrossing with each outing. Here, Tempe takes on an especially gruesome case in a richly plotted tale about an airline crash, missing body parts and cannibalism. The story opens in the rugged backwoods of North Carolina, where Tempe must identify the dead from the remains of a passenger jet that spiraled straight into the ground. While rummaging through the grisly debris, she comes across a foot that doesn't appear to match any of the 88 dead people aboard the jet. As investigators determine what brought the plane down, Tempe looks into the mystery of the foot. That seemingly well-intentioned pursuit gets her fired. Her ouster appears to be the doing of Lt. Gov. Parker Davenport, an ambitious politician taking an abnormal interest in the crash. Tempe, determined to restore her reputation, plows back into the case on the sly. What she finds is evidence of a chilling, depraved episode in local history that upends many common perceptions about North Carolina's political and business elite. Reichs, herself a highly accomplished forensic anthropologist, expertly directs a busy plot that moves with electrical force in the final quarter. She capitalizes on the morbid yet captivating aspects of the forensic trenchwork, yet never lets it overwhelm her story. But it is Reichs's ongoing development of Tempe a woman in her 50s with a mature understanding of human nature, and a self-deprecating sense of humor that truly lifts the book above many of its peers.

From Booklist - *Starred Review*
Initially, it appears the only tragic journey traced in Reichs' fourth Tempe Brennan tale is the devastating crash, in western North Carolina's forested hills, of a regional airliner full of college soccer players and their fans. Brennan, a forensic anthropologist who (like Reichs) works in both North Carolina and Quebec, joins with federal and state postcrash investigators, matching horrific body fragments to TransSouth Air Flight 228's passengers. Much to Brennan's surprise, Montreal cop Andrew Brennan shows up; his partner, Jean Bertrand, was booked on the flight, escorting an extradited prisoner. But Brennan encounters a forensic inventory problem: the foot she rescued from a pack of coyotes doesn't match anyone on the plane. When Brennan tries to identify its owner, she's smeared by a politician desperate to preserve the secrets of a group of power brokers who have gathered for years at a nearby hunting lodge. To save her reputation (and her life), Brennan must find the source of the telltale foot. A complicated, involving mystery.
-- Mary Carroll
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

From Library Journal
Reichs is at the top of her game with her fourth forensic thriller (after Deadly Decisions) as once again Dr. Tempe Brennan must "tease posthumous tales from bones," utilizing all of her skills as a forensic anthropologist to put the dead to rest. Tempe is called to the Great Smoky Mountains, scene of the crash of TransSouth Air flight 228 where 88 souls suffered gruesome deaths. As the medical teams work to reassemble and identify bodies, Tempe makes a disturbing discovery a foot that doesn't belong to any of the victims. While investigating the foot's origins, Tempe stumbles on a mountain cabin and is immediately banned from the recovery operations, accused of malfeasance. Something sinister is going on, and Tempe must unravel the mystery to save her reputation. What she discovers is shocking. Reichs once again proves that she is master of the genre; her science is impeccable, her characters are believably complex, and her plotting and pacing are nearly flawless. Often compared to Patricia Cornwell, Reichs is raising the bar. Highly recommended for all fiction collections.
-- Rebecca House Stankowski, Purdue Univ. Calumet Lib., Hammond, IN.
Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

 

SELECTED REVIEWS FOR
Death du Jour

From Publishers Weekly
"Triumphant... As in Déjà Dead, Reichs... renders comprehensively and believably the cool, tense intelligence of her heroine. Reich's first novel... was compared justifiably to the Kay Scarpetta novels of Patricia Cornwell. Soon Cornwell's novels may be compared to Reichs's."

From Kirkus Reviews, March 19, 1999
Called from her peaceful exhumation of the century-old bones of Sister Elisabeth Nicolet, whose heroic work during Quebec's 1885 smallpox epidemic may qualify her for sainthood, consulting anthropologist Temperance Brennan finds herself in a charnel house. The two bodies that have been discovered in a burning house in St-Jovite were both murdered, one horribly, before the fire was set, and four more corpses, two of them infants, are found nearby. This tableau, showing Reichs's strength in the gruesome details of forensics, is only Act One of a tale that will involve Tempe with a student missing from McGill University, a threateningly oracular professor of religious studies, and Tempe's own flamboyant sister, Harriet Lamour. When the grisly discoveries Tempe's made in the lab link the dead of St-Jovite to Dominick Owens's commune in sleepy Beaufort, South Carolina, the site of two other killings, the evidence shrieks conspiracy, and the prose shrieks along with it: chapters end with the likes of Tempe's trepidation escalat[ing] to real fear, an icy wind rocketing through my soul, and my jaw dropp[ing] in amazement. Beneath all the hand-wringing, readers with strong stomachs will find an even broader canvas than Deja Dead (1997), Reichs's striking debut, though one with more mystification than mystery. Reichs plots ambitiously, knows her way around a morgue, isn't afraid to pile on the Grand Guignol, and spins a tale that reads, well, like a house afire.
-- Copyright ©1999, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

 

SELECTED REVIEWS FOR
Deja Dead

From The New York Times Book Review, Marilyn Stasio
Although she walks and talks like a clone of Kay Scarpetta, the testy medical examiner in Patricia Cornwell's novels, Brennan comes by her forensic expertise legitimately, as the alter ego of a first-time author who is herself an anthropologist for the province of Quebec.

From Library Journal August 1997
A superb new writer introducters her intrepid heroine to crime fiction. Dr. Tempe Brennan, a trowel-packing forensic anthropologist from North Carolina, works in Montreal's Laboratoire de Medecine Legale examining recovered bodies to help police solve missing-persons cases and murders. It's clear to Tempe that the remains of several women killed and savagely mutilated point to a sadistic serial killer, but she can't convince the police. Determined to prevent more brutal deaths, she sleuths solo, tracking her quarry through Montreal's seedy underworld of hookers, where her anthropologist friend Gabby, doing her own scary research, is being stalked by a creep. Despite her ability to work among fetid, putrfying smells that "leap out and grab" and her "go-to-hell attitude" with seasoned cops, Tempe is as vulnerable as a soft Carolina morning. When a grinning skull is planted in her garden, her investigation turns personal and escalates to an intense and satisfying conclusion. Except for imparting an excess of lab information, Reichs, also a forensic anthropologist, drives the pace at a heady clip. A first-class writer, she dazzels readers with sensory imagery that is apt, fresh, and funny (e.g., "fingers felt cold and limp like carrots kept too long in a cooler bin"). Recommended for all fiction collections, this read is sure to be in demand. -Molly Gorman

From Booklist , July 19, 1997
Temperance Brennan may not be competition for Kay Scarpetta, Patricia Cornwell's medical examiner, in the romance department, but she's just as stubborn and almost as astute when it comes to sleuthing. While investigating a grisly discovery for the Montreal coroner's office, Tempe finds herself remembering a similar investigation she conducted on the remains of a woman who was savagely dismembered and stuffed in garbage bags. When Tempe's concerns about a serial killer are dismissed by the police, she decides to pursue the matter herself--a course of action that both puts her career on the line and so effectively upsets the murderer's plan that he sets his sights on her. Montreal, with its French culture, is an enticing setting for Reichs' first mystery, and as a forensic anthropologist who spends part of her time working for the Province of Quebec, Reich knows the city well. She also contributes a wealth of authentic medical detail as she follows Tempe on her gripping, convoluted quest to catch a psychotic killer. A high-voltage thriller that readers won't want to put down. Reichs' novel generated great interest at the Frankfurt Book Fair and prompted a big-numbers rights auction.
-- Stephanie Zvirin Copyright© 1997, American Library Association. All rights reserved.

From Kirkus Reviews, June 15, 1997
"...Readers ravenous for ghoulish detail and hints of unfathomable evil, spruced up by the modishly effective Quebec setting, will gobble this first course greedily and expect better-balanced nutrition next time."

 

Kathy Reichs — Bones to Ashes — June 2007

Kathy Reichs, like her fictional creation Temperance Brennan, is a board-certified forensic anthropologist for the Laboratoire de Sciences Judiciaires et de Médecine Légale for the province of Quebec, a position she also held at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, State of North Carolina. She is Vice President of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and serves on the National Police Services Advisory Council in Canada. A professor of anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Dr. Reichs received her Ph.D. at Northwestern University. She now divides her time between Charlotte and Montreal. Her debut novel, Déjà Dead, brought her fame when it became a New York Times bestseller, a #1 international bestseller, and winner of the 1997 Ellis Award for Best First Novel.


Kathy Reichs on her forensic work and her novels | June 1999

Forensic anthropologist and novelist Kathy Reichs introduces her latest book "Death du Jour". Since this show, Fox television produced a series called "Bones" which is based on her novels.

Please visit Kathy Reichs' personal website for contact and more detailed information: