Thanks for visiting today. The names above are just a few Friends of Literati we hope you'll get to know while you're here. Since 1997 our editors have hand-selected those writers we choose to feature on this site, along with the fine books they have published, and that will always be one of Literati's main functions—to introduce you to some really interesting people who have things to say, whether fiction or non-fiction.

The best place to start is on the Authors page. Choose your favorite categories, and we'll offer up a fine selection of writers who meet your criteria. We'll also be offering space here to new and upcoming authors on an invitation-only basis. If you are an author with a book needing readers, perhaps we can help. Contact us here and we'll describe the process.

And we're constantly in touch with many authors and publishers, so signed books flow to us regularly. We give these away, so be sure to sign up for our newsletter to ensure you're in the loop for these freebies. We love giving away books.



July 26th
Jeffrey Toobin’s “American Heiress” gives new resonance to an American crime story that had tremendous notoriety in the 1970s.
July 26th
Dr. LaHaye, an evangelical minister and prolific writer, was co-author of the apocalyptic “Left Behind” novels and promoted traditional conservative organizations.
July 26th
Immigration is an emotional issue. Three new books offer rational perspective.
July 27th
Sometimes the simplest of ideas are the most revolutionary. Art is expensive, often ludicrously so. Even with lesser-known emerging artists, an original artwork will set you back hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars. But an art book? Not so much. For ma…
July 25th
Ah, teen love. It was so different back in 1951. And yet, not. Youths still stalked one another ― they just did so by peering into windows instead of browsing Facebook photos. Case in point: this scene from the new movie “Indignation,” b…
July 25th
The 36th Annual Ernest “Papa” Hemingway Look-Alike Contest ended in a way that can only be described as novel.For the first time ever, the winning “Papa” wannabe was actually a real Hemingway.Dave Hemingway of Macon, North Carolina…
July 27th
Minicomics are kind of a relic — few artists now want to go to the trouble of printing and distributing paper comics. But there are still a few out there that are worth the trouble of hunting down.
July 27th
A Key West bar holds an annual Ernest Hemingway look-alike contest. For the first time, an actual Hemingway won. Dave Hemingway (no relation) says he also likes to fish, drink and have a good time.
July 26th
As TV dramas get better and better, publishers are getting into the game with serialized fiction. Some are even referring to what they publish as "episodes" and "seasons" rather than "books."

LONGTIME LITERATI MEMBER
WINIFRED GALLAGHER
ANNOUNCES HER NEW BOOK

photo-winifred-gallagher.png

How the Post Office

Created America


A History

Penguin Press, 2016

A masterful history of a long underappreciated institution, How the Post Office Created America examines the surprising role of the postal service in our nation's political, social, economic, and physical development.

The founders established the post office before they had even signed the Declaration of Independence, and for a very long time, it was the U.S. government's largest and most important endeavor—indeed, it was the government for most citizens. This was no conventional mail network but the central nervous system of the new body politic, designed to bind thirteen quarrelsome colonies into the United States by delivering news about public affairs to every citizen—a radical idea that appalled Europe's great powers. America's uniquely democratic post powerfully shaped its lively, argumentative culture of uncensored ideas and opinions and made it the world's information and communications superpower with astonishing speed.

Winifred Gallagher presents the history of the post office as America's own story, told from a fresh perspective over more than two centuries. The mandate to deliver the mail—then "the media"—imposed the federal footprint on vast, often contested parts of the continent and transformed a wilderness into a social landscape of post roads and villages centered on post offices. The post was the catalyst of the nation's transportation grid, from the stagecoach lines to the airlines, and the lifeline of the great migration from the Atlantic to the Pacific. It enabled America to shift from an agrarian to an industrial economy and to develop the publishing industry, the consumer culture, and the political party system. Still one of the country's two major civilian employers, the post was the first to hire women, African Americans, and other minorities for positions in public life.

Starved by two world wars and the Great Depression, confronted with the country's increasingly anti-institutional mind-set, and struggling with its doubled mail volume, the post stumbled badly in the turbulent 1960s. Distracted by the ensuing modernization of its traditional services, however, it failed to transition from paper mail to email, which prescient observers saw as its logical next step. Now the post office is at a crossroads. Before deciding its future, Americans should understand what this grand yet overlooked institution has accomplished since 1775 and consider what it should and could contribute in the twenty-first century.

Gallagher argues that now, more than ever before, the imperiled post office deserves this effort, because just as the founders anticipated, it created forward-looking, communication-oriented, idea-driven America.


Coming Soon is, well, coming soon. We'll be giving away copies of signed books by many of our featured authors. Check back here. Soon.