Thanks for visiting today. The names above are just a few Friends of Literati we hope you'll get to know while you're here. Since 1997 our editors have hand-selected those writers we choose to feature on this site, along with the fine books they have published, and that will always be one of Literati's main functions—to introduce you to some really interesting people who have things to say, whether fiction or non-fiction.

The best place to start is on the Authors page. Choose your favorite categories, and we'll offer up a fine selection of writers who meet your criteria. We'll also be offering space here to new and upcoming authors on an invitation-only basis. If you are an author with a book needing readers, perhaps we can help. Contact us here and we'll describe the process.

And we're constantly in touch with many authors and publishers, so signed books flow to us regularly. We give these away, so be sure to sign up for our newsletter to ensure you're in the loop for these freebies. We love giving away books.



June 30th
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong delivers a solid history of this influential TV series, while exploring its cultural staying power.
June 30th
Mr. Meisler, covered sub-Saharan Africa for The Los Angeles Times and wrote books about the U.N. and Paris’s art world between the wars.
June 30th
A six-part mini-series about the intrepid couple, who made their debut in 1998, will open in October.
June 30th
This article first appeared on QuietRev.comMy study of the English language began with prepositions: on top of, next to, behind, under. Then they developed into real sentences, phrases that I would conjure up in my head while lying in bed or grudging…
June 30th
http://huffingtonpost.tumblr.com/post/146713268745/new-leaf-with-huffpost-editor-maddie-crum-features Before the earwormy Disney hit “Frozen” made sentimental children of us all, Hans Christian Andersen wrote a story about a young girl who sa…
June 30th
Hilde Lysiak is living proof that you shouldn’t let haters get you down.The 9-year-old reporter who runs the Orange Street News in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, faced down rude remarks from concern trolls in April after she broke the story of a murder …
June 30th
Future Shock by Alvin Toffler was a huge sensation when it was published in 1970. The book perfectly captured the angst of that time and prepared society for more changes to come.
June 29th
Bob Proehl's sprawling novel follows actor Valerie and her son Alex on an epic road trip, punctuated by stops at comic conventions. It's a charming but messy debut that crams in too many ideas.
June 29th
Cathleen Schine's new novel explores how one character's physical and mental decline ripples out to affect his whole family. Critic Maureen Corrigan calls it a mix of "fun and bad behavior."

LONGTIME LITERATI MEMBER
WINIFRED GALLAGHER
ANNOUNCES HER NEW BOOK

photo-winifred-gallagher.png

How the Post Office

Created America


A History

Penguin Press, 2016

A masterful history of a long underappreciated institution, How the Post Office Created America examines the surprising role of the postal service in our nation's political, social, economic, and physical development.

The founders established the post office before they had even signed the Declaration of Independence, and for a very long time, it was the U.S. government's largest and most important endeavor—indeed, it was the government for most citizens. This was no conventional mail network but the central nervous system of the new body politic, designed to bind thirteen quarrelsome colonies into the United States by delivering news about public affairs to every citizen—a radical idea that appalled Europe's great powers. America's uniquely democratic post powerfully shaped its lively, argumentative culture of uncensored ideas and opinions and made it the world's information and communications superpower with astonishing speed.

Winifred Gallagher presents the history of the post office as America's own story, told from a fresh perspective over more than two centuries. The mandate to deliver the mail—then "the media"—imposed the federal footprint on vast, often contested parts of the continent and transformed a wilderness into a social landscape of post roads and villages centered on post offices. The post was the catalyst of the nation's transportation grid, from the stagecoach lines to the airlines, and the lifeline of the great migration from the Atlantic to the Pacific. It enabled America to shift from an agrarian to an industrial economy and to develop the publishing industry, the consumer culture, and the political party system. Still one of the country's two major civilian employers, the post was the first to hire women, African Americans, and other minorities for positions in public life.

Starved by two world wars and the Great Depression, confronted with the country's increasingly anti-institutional mind-set, and struggling with its doubled mail volume, the post stumbled badly in the turbulent 1960s. Distracted by the ensuing modernization of its traditional services, however, it failed to transition from paper mail to email, which prescient observers saw as its logical next step. Now the post office is at a crossroads. Before deciding its future, Americans should understand what this grand yet overlooked institution has accomplished since 1775 and consider what it should and could contribute in the twenty-first century.

Gallagher argues that now, more than ever before, the imperiled post office deserves this effort, because just as the founders anticipated, it created forward-looking, communication-oriented, idea-driven America.


Coming Soon is, well, coming soon. We'll be giving away copies of signed books by many of our featured authors. Check back here. Soon.