Thanks for visiting today. The names above are just a few Friends of Literati we hope you'll get to know while you're here. Since 1997 our editors have hand-selected those writers we choose to feature on this site, along with the fine books they have published, and that will always be one of Literati's main functions—to introduce you to some really interesting people who have things to say, whether fiction or non-fiction.

The best place to start is on the Authors page. Choose your favorite categories, and we'll offer up a fine selection of writers who meet your criteria. We'll also be offering space here to new and upcoming authors on an invitation-only basis. If you are an author with a book needing readers, perhaps we can help. Contact us here and we'll describe the process.

And we're constantly in touch with many authors and publishers, so signed books flow to us regularly. We give these away, so be sure to sign up for our newsletter to ensure you're in the loop for these freebies. We love giving away books.



August 30th
Dr. Sacks explored some of the brain’s strangest pathways in best-selling case histories like “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat,” achieving a level of renown rare among scientists.
August 30th
This book, subtitled “The March to World War I & Revolution,” looks to place Russia “where it belongs, at the very center” of the war.
August 30th
Whether writing about his patients, his love of chemistry or the power of music, Dr. Sacks leapfrogged among disciplines, shedding light on the connections between science and art.
August 28th
After journalist Jon Birger entered his 30s, he began to notice a pattern in his social circle: Most of the men he knew were married or in a relationship and most of the women he knew were single and having a hard time dating. These women had "everything …
August 28th
Guys. I thought we’d been over this. I thought it was settled.“Basic,” a slang term perceived by mainstream white America as referring to blond women wearing yoga pants and holding pumpkin spice lattes, has been repeatedly investiga…
August 28th
With a heaving chest, a cross-faded Sylvia Plath explains the process of electroshock therapy to Yeats using a Ouija board. There are two different types, you know. She's rather prone to panic attacks -- mostly frantic yelling for Ted -- though in this mo…
August 30th
The teen heroine of Nicola Yoon's debut novel, Everything, Everything, has a disorder that bars her from leaving her house. Still, her world is vast, filled with writings, drawings — and new love.
August 30th
His book Awakenings, about reviving patients from a catatonic state, was turned into a 1990 film. He also wrote more than a dozen other books, including The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat.
August 30th
Hermann Simon's mother lived as a Jew in Berlin during World War II. Through cunning and disguise, Marie Jalowicz Simon managed to evade the Nazis right under their noses.

NEW BOOK BY LONGTIME LITERATI MEMBER CRAIG LAMBERT

Shadow Work:

The Unpaid, Unseen Jobs That Fill Your Day

Counterpoint, 2015

With the exception of sleep, humans spend more of their lifetimes on work than any other activity. It is central to our economy, society, and the family. It underpins our finances and our sense of meaning in life. Given the overriding importance of work, we need to recognize a profound transformation in the nature of work that is significantly altering lives: the incoming tidal wave of shadow work.

Shadow work includes all the unpaid tasks we do on behalf of businesses and organizations. It has slipped into our routines stealthily; most of us do not realize how much of it we are already doing, even as we pump our own gas, scan and bag our own groceries, execute our own stock trades, and build our own unassembled furniture. But its presence is unmistakable, and its effects far-reaching.

Fueled by the twin forces of technology and skyrocketing personnel costs, shadow work has taken a foothold in our society. Lambert terms its prevalence as "middle-class serfdom," and examines its sources in the invasion of robotics, the democratization of expertise, and new demands on individuals at all levels of society. The end result? A more personalized form of consumption, a great social leveling (pedigrees don't help with shadow work!), and the weakening of communities as robotics reduce daily human interaction.

Shadow Work offers a field guide to this new phenomenon. It shines a light on these trends now so prevalent in our daily lives and, more importantly, offers valuable insight into how to counter their effects. It will be essential reading to anyone seeking to understand how their day got so full—and how to deal with the ubiquitous shadow work that surrounds them.


Coming Soon is, well, coming soon. We'll be giving away copies of signed books by many of our featured authors. Check back here. Soon.