Thanks for visiting today. The names above are just a few Friends of Literati we hope you'll get to know while you're here. Since 1997 our editors have hand-selected those writers we choose to feature on this site, along with the fine books they have published, and that will always be one of Literati's main functions—to introduce you to some really interesting people who have things to say, whether fiction or non-fiction.

The best place to start is on the Authors page. Choose your favorite categories, and we'll offer up a fine selection of writers who meet your criteria. We'll also be offering space here to new and upcoming authors on an invitation-only basis. If you are an author with a book needing readers, perhaps we can help. Contact us here and we'll describe the process.

And we're constantly in touch with many authors and publishers, so signed books flow to us regularly. We give these away, so be sure to sign up for our newsletter to ensure you're in the loop for these freebies. We love giving away books.



May 25th
The historian explores an era of dizzying technological and artistic creativity, disillusionment and xenophobia between 1918 and 1938.
May 25th
The author is both doubtful and hopeful, old enough to remember the way things used to work, young enough to appreciate technology.
May 25th
Judy Blume’s first novel for adults in 17 years is about a ninth-grade Jewish girl and her New Jersey community in the aftermath of three plane crashes in the town.
May 24th
A good "Game of Thrones" episode can be a lot of things. It can be one that triggers a powerful, emotional reaction for a beloved character, one that stuns its audience with a shocking death, or even an episode that spends the entire hour depicting an epi…
May 22nd
Walter ... walrus ... whoa. So you've seen "The Big Lebowski" dozens of times. You loved "Alice in Wonderland" when you were a kid -- and you loved it even more when you grew up and understood all the drug-related undertones. But what if we told you that …
May 22nd
Few things stir up childhood nostalgia as quickly as a fresh box of crayons. It's easy to see what makes them an appealing collectors' item. For Ed Welter, a former Nike project manager from Oregon, the allure went a step further. No one, not even Crayol…
May 24th
"I've never accused myself of being manly," Offerman says, noting his real-life persona is different from his Parks and Recreation character. His book is a set of essays about people who inspire him.
May 24th
Johnson, the son of an African-American mother and an Irish-American father, has just written Loving Day, a funny, sometimes absurd look at what it means to grow up mixed heritage in the U.S.
May 24th
Naomi Novik's latest is a re-worked "Beauty and the Beast," with a powerful female friendship at its heart. Reviewer Amal El-Mohtar calls it "moving, heart-breaking, and thoroughly satisfying."

NEW BOOK BY LONGTIME LITERATI MEMBER CRAIG LAMBERT

Shadow Work:

The Unpaid, Unseen Jobs That Fill Your Day

Counterpoint, 2015

With the exception of sleep, humans spend more of their lifetimes on work than any other activity. It is central to our economy, society, and the family. It underpins our finances and our sense of meaning in life. Given the overriding importance of work, we need to recognize a profound transformation in the nature of work that is significantly altering lives: the incoming tidal wave of shadow work.

Shadow work includes all the unpaid tasks we do on behalf of businesses and organizations. It has slipped into our routines stealthily; most of us do not realize how much of it we are already doing, even as we pump our own gas, scan and bag our own groceries, execute our own stock trades, and build our own unassembled furniture. But its presence is unmistakable, and its effects far-reaching.

Fueled by the twin forces of technology and skyrocketing personnel costs, shadow work has taken a foothold in our society. Lambert terms its prevalence as "middle-class serfdom," and examines its sources in the invasion of robotics, the democratization of expertise, and new demands on individuals at all levels of society. The end result? A more personalized form of consumption, a great social leveling (pedigrees don't help with shadow work!), and the weakening of communities as robotics reduce daily human interaction.

Shadow Work offers a field guide to this new phenomenon. It shines a light on these trends now so prevalent in our daily lives and, more importantly, offers valuable insight into how to counter their effects. It will be essential reading to anyone seeking to understand how their day got so full—and how to deal with the ubiquitous shadow work that surrounds them.


Coming Soon is, well, coming soon. We'll be giving away copies of signed books by many of our featured authors. Check back here. Soon.