Thanks for visiting today. The names above are just a few Friends of Literati we hope you'll get to know while you're here. Since 1997 our editors have hand-selected those writers we choose to feature on this site, along with the fine books they have published, and that will always be one of Literati's main functions—to introduce you to some really interesting people who have things to say, whether fiction or non-fiction.

The best place to start is on the Authors page. Choose your favorite categories, and we'll offer up a fine selection of writers who meet your criteria. We'll also be offering space here to new and upcoming authors on an invitation-only basis. If you are an author with a book needing readers, perhaps we can help. Contact us here and we'll describe the process.

And we're constantly in touch with many authors and publishers, so signed books flow to us regularly. We give these away, so be sure to sign up for our newsletter to ensure you're in the loop for these freebies. We love giving away books.

October 9th
Kate Clifford Larson discusses the life of Rosemary Kennedy, and Larissa MacFarquhar talks about “Strangers Drowning.”
October 9th
A new book by John D. Spooner, “No One Ever Told Us That: Money and Life Lessons for Young Adults,” speaks to people in their 20s and 30s but has good advice for everybody.
October 9th
In these impassioned essays, Birkerts warns that the power of language and literature to sustain the self is under threat from “the tidal inrush of digitized living.”
October 10th
As we reflect on milestones made within the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community during October's LGBT history month, HuffPost Live spoke with Lesléa Newman, the author of the groundbreaking 1989 children's book&nb…
October 9th
Robert Pattinson apparently understood his "Twilight" character better than the woman who created him. According to BuzzFeed, the book series' author Stephenie Meyer stopped by Comic Con in New York on Thursday, where she spoke to fans about her new …
October 9th
Consider the book. No, not your favorite book, the one with the plucky heroine and heart-wrenching plot twist. Not the one that’s coming out as a movie adaptation later this year, either. Just any old book -- the physical object that contains those …
October 10th
Laura Anne Gilman creates an authentically spooky Old West in her novel, where it seems perfectly reasonable that the Devil might wear a sharp suit, run a saloon, and always stay true to his bargains.
October 10th
Biographer Jonathan Bate says his job is to write about "the quality and endurance of the literary work." His new biography has been disavowed by the Hughes estate.
October 10th
David Jaher's account of Harry Houdini attempt to debunk Boston society psychic Mina Crandon mixes history with high-wire theatricality — even though most readers will know who came out on top.


Shadow Work:

The Unpaid, Unseen Jobs That Fill Your Day

Counterpoint, 2015

With the exception of sleep, humans spend more of their lifetimes on work than any other activity. It is central to our economy, society, and the family. It underpins our finances and our sense of meaning in life. Given the overriding importance of work, we need to recognize a profound transformation in the nature of work that is significantly altering lives: the incoming tidal wave of shadow work.

Shadow work includes all the unpaid tasks we do on behalf of businesses and organizations. It has slipped into our routines stealthily; most of us do not realize how much of it we are already doing, even as we pump our own gas, scan and bag our own groceries, execute our own stock trades, and build our own unassembled furniture. But its presence is unmistakable, and its effects far-reaching.

Fueled by the twin forces of technology and skyrocketing personnel costs, shadow work has taken a foothold in our society. Lambert terms its prevalence as "middle-class serfdom," and examines its sources in the invasion of robotics, the democratization of expertise, and new demands on individuals at all levels of society. The end result? A more personalized form of consumption, a great social leveling (pedigrees don't help with shadow work!), and the weakening of communities as robotics reduce daily human interaction.

Shadow Work offers a field guide to this new phenomenon. It shines a light on these trends now so prevalent in our daily lives and, more importantly, offers valuable insight into how to counter their effects. It will be essential reading to anyone seeking to understand how their day got so full—and how to deal with the ubiquitous shadow work that surrounds them.

Coming Soon is, well, coming soon. We'll be giving away copies of signed books by many of our featured authors. Check back here. Soon.